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Benefits of Engaging an Executive Coach

Jul 16, 2018 Tips

“Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.”* But can greatness be learned? According to some studies, it can be taught. Executive coaching has surged in popularity over the past three decades, and for good reason... it works. Below are just some of the benefits of engaging an executive coach:

Be a better leader. What do the likes of Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, and Eric Schmidt have in common? Yes, they are all great leaders. But more importantly, they are great leaders who worked with a coach. “A coach is somebody who looks at something with another set of eyes, describes it to you in [his] words, and discusses how to approach the problem,” says Eric Schmidt. For a leader, having an outside perspective can be key to personal growth and building your authentic self. 

Build better relationships. Through the process of building self-awareness, you understand the shadow you cast as a leader. This allows you to understand how others perceive you and your actions to build improved relationships.

Build upon your strengths. Executive coaching simultaneously enhances your natural strengths while identifying growth opportunities to become the best version of yourself.

Bring your goals to light. The role of a coach is to support your needs and goals. Unlike someone from work or a family member, a coach can give their objective input to make your goals clearer and achievable.

“Everyone needs a coach,” says Bill Gates in his Ted Talk. Greatness can be inherited, achieved, entrusted, and now? Coached. Leaders require individually tailored solutions to achieve personal breakthroughs. To take your leadership to the next level, contact us about our Executive Coaching services.

Lead to the Max 

References:

Andersen, Erika. 6 Ways An Executive Coach Can Make You More Successful. Forbes., 22 Dec. 2017.
Gates, Bill. Teachers Need Real Feedback. TedTalk, 2013.  
Kauffman, Carol, and Diane Coutu. What Can Coaches Do for You? Harvard Business Review, 7 Sept. 2017. 

* Quote attributed to William Shakespeare in Twelfth Night. 

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